Michigan Energy Committee to Host 2 Free Market Energy Experts

(Updated May 29th, 2017)

May 27th, 2017 – An Opportunity to Show Support for Chairman Glenn’s Efforts to Move Michigan Toward a Freer Energy Environment – We strongly encourage all smart meter activists who can to attend the hearing of the Michigan House Energy Committee on Tuesday May 30th at 9 am in the Anderson House Office Building, Room 519, at 124 North Capitol Avenue, Lansing. There is a parking ramp 2 blocks north of the Anderson building on Capitol Avenue.

Chairman Gary Glenn has arranged for two of the leading proponents of replacing some of the regulation with more competition in the energy markets. This program should be quite different from some of the industry and state government people who have testified up to now.

Smart meters are just one example of what happens when there is too much monopoly power. Utilities in Michigan are forcing us to take these unwanted meters while at the same time charging us some of the highest rates in the midwest and providing less reliability and fewer choices.

The experts Glenn is bringing in can provide competent testimony about what happens when utility customers have more choices:

Todd Snitchler is former Chair of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO). He was first appointed in 2011 by Governor John Kasich and served on that commission until 2014. He is now a practicing attorney. Under Snitchler’s leadership Ohio made major progress in moving its utility industry away from a highly regulated model toward more competition and innovation. A scholarly article discussing utility deregulation in that state with many citations to his contributions can be found here:

http://cua6.urban.csuohio.edu/publications/center/center_for_economic_development/ElectricityMarketsInOhio

Dr. Gary L. Wolfram, an adjunct scholar at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, is a Professor of Economics at Hillsdale College. In 2015 he released his new study Improving Michigan’s Electric Utility Industry. In the study, Wolfram highlights inefficiencies in Michigan’s regulated energy sector and recommends that legislative action is needed to control costs, reduce pollution and improve outcomes. A discussion of his work may be found here:

http://www.micef.org/press/2015/9/17/hillsdale-economist-gary-wolfram-releases-energy-study-improving-michigans-electric-utility-industry-released-today

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6 thoughts on “Michigan Energy Committee to Host 2 Free Market Energy Experts

  1. Hi there.

    I don’t see where the meeting is?

    [image: photo] *Adrienne Urban* Owner, Whole New Mom wholenewmom@gmail.com | http://wholenewmom.com Get your own email signature

    On Sat, May 27, 2017 at 8:26 PM, michiganstopsmartmeters wrote:

    > Vigilant Dave posted: “May 27th, 2017 – An Opportunity to Show Support for > Chairman Glenn’s Efforts to Move Michigan Toward a Freer Energy Environment > – We strongly encourage all smart meter activists who can attend to the > hearing of the Michigan House Energy Committee on Tuesd” >

    • Adrienne, Mea culpa. I did inded omit the location information. This has been corrected just now in the post. Location is Room 519 of the Anderson House Office Building at 124 North Capitol Avenue, Lansing. Parking is available at the ramp 2 blocks north of the building on Capitol Avenue.

  2. What in the world is going on with the Michigan legislators, as a group and individually, that they still are not all working to stop these NWO devices? That’s not a rhetorical question. The problem includes the lawmakers, but begins with we the people. Deuteronomy 27: 14 thru 28: 68. Genesis 2: 2. Leviticus 23: 3.

  3. I’m against smart meters, Consumers Energy’s energy monopoly in Michigan, and the extortion in cost for those of us opting out!

  4. Try something that will work. File a complaint with the Department of Justice or the Federal Trade Commission and request an investigation into whether the utilities are violating the Anti-Trust Laws, specifically, the Sherman Act.

    The Sherman Act promotes “free and unfettered competition as the rule of the trade.”

    Go to the Federal Trade Commission and file a consumer complaint.

    According to the Sherman Act, it outlaws, “every contract, combination, or conspiracy in restraint of trade,” and any “monopolization, attempted monopolization, or conspiracy or combination to monopolize.”

    The Sherman Act also imposes criminal penalties. Private parties can also bring suit to enforce the antitrust laws.

    • Theresa, Interesting idea, but I am pretty sure that utilities, operating under state laws that specifically set them up as monopolies, would be exempt from federal anti-trust laws.

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